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Afrikan Mental Liberation Films Photos (2003)                   

Eso Won Bookstore will carry books and CD's from Afrikan Mental Liberation Weekend.

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Essays by Dr. Kwaku Person-Lynn

The following essays are from a new book Touching The Soul: Revolution In History, Culture & Critical Issues – Quick Notes.  It is now in the re-writing and editing stage.

Beethoven: Revealing His True Identity

 In the 15th and 16th century, written history underwent a massive campaign of misinformation and deception. WithBeethoven 2 the European slave trade in full swing, Afrikans were transported to various parts of the world and were stripped of every aspect of their humanity, and in most of western civilization, were no longer considered human. This triggered a wholesale interpretation of history that methodically excluded Afrikans from any respectful mention, other than a legacy of slavery. This can result in being taught, or socialized, from one perspective. In this instance, historical information tends to flow strictly from a European perspective. No judgment of right or wrong is being made here, only that the breadth was very narrow in scope.

In an age where history is seriously being rewritten, new information is coming forth that is shocking intellectual sensitivities. What was once considered written in stone is now melting away with the discovery of facts that heretofore have been hidden or omitted; things so different that they are generally classified as controversial or unusual.

What specifically is being referenced, is the true identity of Ludwig van Beethoven, considered Europe’s greatest classical music composer. Directly, Beethoven was a black man. Specifically, his mother was a Moor, that group of Muslim Africans who conquered parts of Europe--making Spain their capital--for some 800 years.

In order to make such a substantial statement, presentation of verifiable evidence is compulsory. Let's start with what some of Beethoven's contemporaries and biographers say about his appearance. Frau Fisher, a close friend of Beethoven, described him with “blackish-brown complexion.” Frederick Hertz, German anthropologist, used these terms to describe him: “Negroid traits, dark skin, flat, thick nose.”

Emil Ludwig, in his book “Beethoven,” says: “His face reveals no trace of the German. He was so dark that people dubbed him Spagnol [dark-skinned].” Fanny Giannatasio del Rio, in her book “An Unrequited Love: An Episode in the Life of Beethoven,” wrote “His somewhat flat broad nose and rather wide mouth, his small piercing eyes and swarthy [dark] complexion, pockmarked into the bargain, gave him a strong resemblance to a mulatto.” C. Czerny stated, “His beard--he had not shaved for several days--made the lower part of his already brown face still darker.”

 Following are one word descriptions of Beethoven from various writers: Grillparzer, “dark”; Bettina von Armin, “brown”; Schindler, “red and brown”; Rellstab, “brownish”; Gelinek, “short, dark.”

Newsweek, in its Sept. 23, 1991 issue stated, “Afrocentrism ranges over the whole panorama of human history, coloring in the faces: from Australopithecus to the inventors of mathematics to the great Negro composer Beethoven.

Of course, in the world of scholarship there are those who take an opposite view. In the book The Changing Image of Beethoven by Alessandra Comini, an array of arguments are presented. Donald W. MacArdle, in a 1949 Musical Quarterly article came to the conclusion that there was “no Spanish, no Belgian, no Dutch, no African” in Beethoven's genealogy. Dominque-Rene de Lerma, the great musical bibliologist, came to the same conclusion.

Included in this amazing discussion is a reference made of Beethoven’s teacher, Andre de Hevesy, in his book, Beethoven The Man. “Everyone knows the incident at Kismarton, or Eisenstadt, the residence of Prince Esterhazy, on his birthday. In the middle of the first allegro of Haydn’s symphony, His Highness asked the name of the author. He was brought forward.

“‘What!’ exclaimed the Prince, ‘the music is by the blackamoor (a black Moor). Well, my fine blackamoor, henceforth thou art in my service.’

“‘What is thy name?’

“‘Joseph Haydn.’”

We have all been fed false information for reasons previously mentioned. It is no secret that scholars, writers, critics, advertisers and Hollywood have changed history for their own specific reasons. What is uniquely different in the intellectual landscape, people of color now have an army of sophisticated scholars to combat the continuation and dissemination of false information that has been accepted as standard, as well as the canon in academia.

It is hoped that the revealing of this information will motivate others to critically look at all data flowing in their brains for authenticity. Hollywood is notorious for changing facts. I am not saying to hate Hollywood, but we do have to hold it accountable for disseminating inaccurate depictions, especially when it changes the course of history, by which our children are influenced.

Graphic credits:

1.) Louis Letronne, Beethoven, 1814, pencil drawing.

2.) Blasius Hofel, Beethoven, 1814, monochrome facsimile of engraving after a pencil drawing by Louis Letronne.

3.) Engraving by Blasius Hofel, Beethoven, 1814, color facsimile of engraving after a pencil drawing by Louis Letronne. This engraving was regarded in Beethoven's circle as particularly lifelike. Beethoven himself thought highly of it, and gave several copies to his friends.

©2009Kwaku Person-Lynn

Examining The Virgin Birth/Resurrection Story


One of the most difficult discussions one can engage in is the subject of religion. Powerful internal beliefs, no matter ones spiritual persuasion, can illicit very intense emotions. It can sometimes end a friendship or association. However, it can also stimulate a very positive bond.

Where one is born, what culture one is raised in, and the consistency of spiritual direction given while young can strongly influence what religion one chooses to involve her/himself in. Some change as they age, but true believers are unshakable in their chosen faith.

Looking at this issue from a western perspective will almost always lean one towards a Christian understanding. Investigating from a worldview will allow one to inspect practically all belief systems with a balanced and open mind. Attempting to break away from one perspective thinking and analyzing, every effort will be made to discuss this topic from a world perspective. Being born and raised in the West can sometimes blind one from comprehending other realities. What is most times labeled as controversial or unacceptable is simply looking at one subject, religion, from different cultural and/or intellectual attitudes.

Before proceeding any further, let it be understood that in absolutely no way is there any suggestion of no existence of a Creator or Supreme Being. That is not even a thought. It is the various religious human creations where the mystification is fashioned. This reveals itself just in the conversation on human origin.

On one side, particularly in the West, though there are thousands of stories from various cultures, is the Creationist view (Adam & Eve). This is a view based on faith in the accuracy of Christian scriptures. Although recently, the terminology has been gradually leaning towards a new term, “Intelligent Design.” This is seen as an effort of being more convincing.

However, on the other side of this discussion is the “Theory of Evolution;” that humanity evolved from several life cycles starting with a single cell. This is usually depicted as the scientific view, based on empirical evidence; something that can be proven. As mentioned, there are several other views. These are the most prevalent in the western world.

Debating human origins is only the beginning. Probably the most volatile topic in the discussion of religion is how one approaches the subject of a Savior. In most of western culture the subject of a Savior centers on Jesus, the Christ. There is a clear explanation for this.

When the Emperor of the Roman Empire converted to Christianity, that reverberated throughout the territories under Roman control. In far too many cases, you either converted or faced death. That meant a widely enormous influence in Europe, which colonized the western world. When the Europeans settled in the Americas, they brought their religion with them. Practically everyone under their control had to convert to Christianity, sometimes by very brutal force, as witnessed during the Crusades and Inquisitions in Europe, and the genocide of Native Americans. Christianity, aided by Judaism, were in full control during the initiation of the Atlantic slave trade. Under the banner of Islam, approximately 1000 years before the Christians, the East Indian Ocean slave trade was created, and still exists today.

When assessing the validity of a Savior or Messiah, two major events are consistently mentioned, the Immaculate Conception or virgin birth, and the Resurrection or rising from the dead and ascending into Heaven or Paradise. Nothing supersedes these two occurrences as the most important in classifying one as a Savior. The problem we face here, particularly in the western world, is associating these events with only one being, Jesus, the Christ.

Things become very difficult for the western mind when looking at these two events from other parts of the world, during different historical periods, even before the birth of Jesus. These two events have been associated with various other beings in different cultures.

The first human recording of these two events are found in northeast Afrika, Kemet, which the Greeks called Egypt, around 4100 B.C.E. It focuses on Ausar (Osiris), Auset (Isis) and Heru (Horus), reputably known as the original trinity; the father, the mother, the son [parentheses indicates Greek names]. There are temples in Kemet where these events were drawn in stone thousands of years before the birth of Jesus. The Temple of Luxor, inscribed by King Amenhotep III (1538-1501 B.C.E.) shows four scenes on the birth of Heru (Horus): The Annunciation, The Immaculate Conception, The Birth and the Adoration. In the Temple of Seti I, in Abydos, the home of Ausar (Osiris), and in the temple at Denderah, one can see The Resurrection of Heru (Horus).

Books such as: The Egyptian Book of the Dead (originally titled The Book of Coming Forth by Day and by Night) by E.A. Wallis Budge; The Coffin Text and The Pyramid Text; The World’s Sixteen Crucified Saviors by Kersey Graves; and Christianity Before Christ by John G. Jackson, among others, have recorded these various stories. Some Egyptologists feel that the triad of deities: Amon, Mut and Khonsu, at the temple in Karnak, was copied by the early Christians to form the present Holy Trinity.

As a side note, according to most Christian scriptures, Jesus was said to have been born in Bethlehem, or Nazareth. In the Coptic writings, where the oldest Christians called Copts still reside (Kemet and Ethiopia), and according to Dr. Yosef ben-Jochannan, a Kemetologist, born in Ethiopia, Jesus was said to have been born in Kemet (Egypt). In Matthew 2:15, it still says, "Out of Egypt shall I call my son!" Contrary to written sources, Kemet (Egypt) is where Christianity was born, while Ethiopia built the first Christian Church and was the world’s first and oldest Christian nation. Christianity was originally an Afrikan religion, as was the Hebrew Afrikan religion called Judaism.

When the Roman Empire converted to Christianity (312 A.D.), and wrestled it from Afrika, the story was changed. This was further confirmed at the Council of Nicea, on May 20th, 325 A.D., called by the Roman Emperor Constantine, and attended by 318 bishops and religious scholars. Together, they formed a new Imperial State Religion, known today as The Roman Catholic Church.

Eighteen books were removed from the original scriptures at this conference. They are called the Apocrypha. The first book in particular, “The Book of Mary,” states that Mary was born of a virgin birth, giving her divine status, which was stripped during the conference. Also, it states that she had a son before Jesus by a virgin birth, James the Lesser. Most Christian denominations do not lend any credence to the Apocrypha. After much editing, it remains in the Catholic Bible.

As mentioned earlier, other beings were associated with the Immaculate Conception and Resurrection story. Their life stories parallel that of Jesus, which parallel that of Heru (Horus). In Mexico, in the Codex Vaticanus, this being is called Quexalcote. In China, in the History of the Rajahs, the name Xaca is mentioned, and also Yu. In India they are called Buddha and Krishna. Sakia, Scipio, Arion, Zulis, Bacchus, Alcides, and Hesus are some of the beings associated with the two events previously mentioned. In actuality, the virgin birth/resurrection story has floated all over the world, in various cultures, various interpretations, before, during and after the Mary Jesus version.

The information revealed here is simply an effort to show that where one is born and the culture one is raised in can influence the story and belief one subscribes to. When surveying world religious views, we find that each culture has its own rituals, realities and beliefs. No effort is made here to suggest which or what is the one truth, other than to say that one story, virgin birth/resurrection, is told different ways with different names all over the world. What is suggested is that the summation of all that has been discussed solidifies the global belief in a Supreme Being, and that the human mind has created numerous interpretations. It begins with Auset (Hathor/Isis), she was the world’s first known deity, and repeated throughout the ages in various forms, “I Auset (Isis) am all that has been, that is or shall be.” Belief in her was so strong the city of Paris, France was named after her.
 

©2009Kwaku Person-Lynn

 

Examining The Virgin Birth/Resurrection Story


One of the most difficult discussions one can engage in is the subject of religion. Powerful internal beliefs, no matter ones spiritual persuasion, can illicit very intense emotions. It can sometimes end a friendship or association. However, it can also stimulate a very positive bond.

Where one is born, what culture one is raised in, and the consistency of spiritual direction given while young can strongly influence what religion one chooses to involve her/himself in. Some change as they age, but true believers are unshakable in their chosen faith.

Looking at this issue from a western perspective will almost always lean one towards a Christian understanding. Investigating from a worldview will allow one to inspect practically all belief systems with a balanced and open mind. Attempting to break away from one perspective thinking and analyzing, every effort will be made to discuss this topic from a world perspective. Being born and raised in the West can sometimes blind one from comprehending other realities. What is most times labeled as controversial or unacceptable is simply looking at one subject, religion, from different cultural and/or intellectual attitudes.

Before proceeding any further, let it be understood that in absolutely no way is there any suggestion of no existence of a Creator or Supreme Being. That is not even a thought. It is the various religious human creations where the mystification is fashioned. This reveals itself just in the conversation on human origin.

On one side, particularly in the West, though there are thousands of stories from various cultures, is the Creationist view (Adam & Eve). This is a view based on faith in the accuracy of Christian scriptures. Although recently, the terminology has been gradually leaning towards a new term, “Intelligent Design.” This is seen as an effort of being more convincing.

However, on the other side of this discussion is the “Theory of Evolution;” that humanity evolved from several life cycles starting with a single cell. This is usually depicted as the scientific view, based on empirical evidence; something that can be proven. As mentioned, there are several other views. These are the most prevalent in the western world.

Debating human origins is only the beginning. Probably the most volatile topic in the discussion of religion is how one approaches the subject of a Savior. In most of western culture the subject of a Savior centers on Jesus, the Christ. There is a clear explanation for this.

When the Emperor of the Roman Empire converted to Christianity, that reverberated throughout the territories under Roman control. In far too many cases, you either converted or faced death. That meant a widely enormous influence in Europe, which colonized the western world. When the Europeans settled in the Americas, they brought their religion with them. Practically everyone under their control had to convert to Christianity, sometimes by very brutal force, as witnessed during the Crusades and Inquisitions in Europe, and the genocide of Native Americans. Christianity, aided by Judaism, were in full control during the initiation of the Atlantic slave trade. Under the banner of Islam, approximately 1000 years before the Christians, the East Indian Ocean slave trade was created, and still exists today.

When assessing the validity of a Savior or Messiah, two major events are consistently mentioned, the Immaculate Conception or virgin birth, and the Resurrection or rising from the dead and ascending into Heaven or Paradise. Nothing supercedes these two occurrences as the most important in classifying one as a Savior. The problem we face here, particularly in the western world, is associating these events with only one being, Jesus, the Christ.

Things become very difficult for the western mind when looking at these two events from other parts of the world, during different historical periods, even before the birth of Jesus. These two events have been associated with various other beings in different cultures.

The first human recording of these two events are found in northeast Afrika, Kemet, which the Greeks called Egypt, around 4100 B.C.E. It focuses on Ausar (Osiris), Auset (Isis) and Heru (Horus), reputably known as the original trinity; the father, the mother, the son [parentheses indicates Greek names]. There are temples in Kemet where these events were drawn in stone thousands of years before the birth of Jesus. The Temple of Luxor, inscribed by King Amenhotep III (1538-1501 B.C.E.) shows four scenes on the birth of Heru (Horus): The Annunciation, The Immaculate Conception, The Birth and the Adoration. In the Temple of Seti I, in Abydos, the home of Ausar (Osiris), and in the temple at Denderah, one can see The Resurrection of Heru (Horus).

Books such as: The Egyptian Book of the Dead (originally titled The Book of Coming Forth by Day and by Night) by E. A. Wallis Budge; The Coffin Text and The Pyramid Text; The World’s Sixteen Crucified Saviors by Kersey Graves; and Christianity Before Christ by John G. Jackson, among others, have recorded these various stories. Some Egyptologists feel that the triad of deities: Amon, Mut and Khonsu, at the temple in Karnak, was copied by the early Christians to form the present Holy Trinity.

As a side note, according to most Christian scriptures, Jesus was said to have been born in Bethlehem, or Nazareth. In the Coptic writings, where the oldest Christians called Copts still reside (Kemet and Ethiopia), and according to Dr. Yosef ben-Jochannan, a Kemetologist, born in Ethiopia, Jesus was said to have been born in Kemet (Egypt). In Matthew 2:15, it still says, "Out of Egypt shall I call my son!" Contrary to written sources, Kemet (Egypt) is where Christianity was born, while Ethiopia built the first Christian Church and was the world’s first and oldest Christian nation. Christianity was originally an Afrikan religion, as was the Hebrew Afrikan religion called Judaism.

When the Roman Empire converted to Christianity (312 A.D.), and wrestled it from Afrika, the story was changed. This was further confirmed at the Council of Nicea, on May 20th, 325 A.D., called by the Roman Emperor Constantine, and attended by 318 bishops and religious scholars. Together, they formed a new Imperial State Religion, known today as The Roman Catholic Church.

Eighteen books were removed from the original scriptures at this conference. They are called the Apocrypha. The first book in particular, “The Book of Mary,” states that Mary was born of a virgin birth, giving her divine status, which was stripped during the conference. Also, it states that she had a son before Jesus by a virgin birth, James the Lesser. Most Christian denominations do not lend any credence to the Apocrypha. After much editing, it remains in the Catholic Bible.

As mentioned earlier, other beings were associated with the Immaculate Conception and Resurrection story. Their life stories parallel that of Jesus, which parallel that of Heru (Horus). In Mexico, in the Codex Vaticanus, this being is called Quexalcote. In China, in the History of the Rajahs, the name Xaca is mentioned, and also Yu. In India they are called Buddha and Krishna. Sakia, Scipio, Arion, Zulis, Bacchus, Alcides, and Hesus are some of the beings associated with the two events previously mentioned. In actuality, the virgin birth/resurrection story has floated all over the world, in various cultures, various interpretations, before, during and after the Mary Jesus version.

The information revealed here is simply an effort to show that where one is born and the culture one is raised in can influence the story and belief one subscribes to. When surveying world religious views, we find that each culture has its own rituals, realities and beliefs. No effort is made here to suggest which or what is the one truth, other than to say that one story, virgin birth/resurrection, is told different ways with different names all over the world. What is suggested is that the summation of all that has been discussed solidifies the global belief in a Supreme Being, and that the human mind has created numerous interpretations. It begins with Auset (Hathor/Isis), she was the world’s first known deity, and repeated throughout the ages in various forms, “I Auset (Isis) am all that has been, that is or shall be.” Belief in her was so strong the city of Paris, France was named after her.
 

©2009Kwaku Person-Lynn